also masquerading as
arabapparel.tumblr.com and straigthttothepoolroom.tumblr.com


Portraits of Women with Vegetable Weapons by Tsuyoshi Ozawa

Portraits of Women with Vegetable Weapons by Tsuyoshi Ozawa

(Source: gallowhill, via badminton)

20:40   9-4-14   52,161 notes

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via valuse)

20:20   9-4-14   85,172 notes

permatech:

Crinkle-Crankle wall, England. (From Wiki)
The crinkle crankle wall economizes on bricks, despite its sinuous configuration, because it can be made just one brick thin. If a wall this thin were to be made in a straight line, without buttresses, it would easily topple over. The alternate convex and concave curves in the wall provide stability and help it to resist lateral forces.
Both crinkle and crankle are defined as something with bends and turns (Webster’s), but the term is also thought to come from Old English meaning zig-zag.
Many crinkle-crankle walls are found in the Fen Country of East Anglia.
[There are some in the States too: Thomas Jefferson (1743 to 1826) incorporated so-called serpentine walls into the architecture of the University of Virginia, which he founded. Flanking both sides of its landmark rotunda and extending down the length of the lawn are 10 pavilions, each with its own walled garden separated by crinkle crankle walls.]
via buffleheadcabin:vanimore

permatech:

Crinkle-Crankle wall, England. (From Wiki)

The crinkle crankle wall economizes on bricks, despite its sinuous configuration, because it can be made just one brick thin. If a wall this thin were to be made in a straight line, without buttresses, it would easily topple over. The alternate convex and concave curves in the wall provide stability and help it to resist lateral forces.

Both crinkle and crankle are defined as something with bends and turns (Webster’s), but the term is also thought to come from Old English meaning zig-zag.

Many crinkle-crankle walls are found in the Fen Country of East Anglia.

[There are some in the States too: Thomas Jefferson (1743 to 1826) incorporated so-called serpentine walls into the architecture of the University of Virginia, which he founded. Flanking both sides of its landmark rotunda and extending down the length of the lawn are 10 pavilions, each with its own walled garden separated by crinkle crankle walls.]

via buffleheadcabin:vanimore

(via androphilia)

20:40   9-3-14   3,323 notes

darkbluetile:

Henri Matisse’s studio 1948

darkbluetile:

Henri Matisse’s studio 1948

(Source: blackturtleneckgirl, via androphilia)

20:20   9-3-14   7,274 notes

(Source: iraffiruse, via space-zacharia)

23:40   9-2-14   4,569 notes

irresisting:

similar posts hereee(q’d ily)

irresisting:

similar posts hereee
(q’d ily)

(Source: sonjabarbaric, via badminton)

23:39   9-2-14   9,574 notes

unexplained-events:

Devil’s Fingers
The picture above is of a mushroom thats thought to be a specimen of Clathrus archeri right before its fingers open up. It closely resembles a hand coming out of the ground. It even has the remnants of its tattered sleeves attached to the wrist.

unexplained-events:

Devil’s Fingers

The picture above is of a mushroom thats thought to be a specimen of Clathrus archeri right before its fingers open up. It closely resembles a hand coming out of the ground. It even has the remnants of its tattered sleeves attached to the wrist.

(via greatlakeswaste)

23:34   9-2-14   26,766 notes

Snake On A Chain (Link Fence)

Snake On A Chain (Link Fence)

(Source: booooooom)

0:00   8-28-14   63,626 notes

nevver:

Message on the mountain, Wim Delvoye

22:24   8-24-14   1,785 notes

experimentsinmotion:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks
Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

experimentsinmotion:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks

Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

(Source: popsci.com)

23:29   8-19-14   4,494 notes